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Uganda Cranes Team Arrives In Gabon Pending Tuesday Action With Ghana

Red Pepper - Sun, 01/15/2017 - 11:14
Uganda Cranes Team Arrives In Gabon Pending Tuesday Action With Ghana

The Ugandan cranes team has safely arrived in Gabon ahead of their opening fixture against Ghana on Tuesday in Port Gentil.  The team landed in the country on Saturday afternoon.

They were received by FUFA advance team of 2nd Vice President, Darius Mugoye, Depurty CEO Humphrey Mandu and Local organising Committee team at Port Gentil Airport.

A 35 man contingent is accommodated at Hotel Du Parc located along the shores of Atlantic Ocean.

The contingent including a group of fans and media all boarded a dometsic flight from Libreville to Port Gentil.

The journey started with a retrun from Dubai, a stop over where they spent the night in Ethioipa before flying out direct to Libreville on Saturday morning.

Uganda Cranes coach Milutin Sredojevic held his team’s first training session at Stade Sogara, 7pm (local time in Gabon) 9 pm EAST.

It is a five minute drive from Hotel Du Parc while reaching the main stadium where they will play Ghana, takes about 25 minutes.

CAF apologises for Cup of Nations anthems gaffe

The Monitor - Sun, 01/15/2017 - 11:09
CAF apologised "to the teams, officials, supporters and viewers" for what it called an "unfortunate incident"

Afcon 2017: Cameroon, Burkina Faso Share Spoils

Chimpreports - Sun, 01/15/2017 - 11:02

Group A
Cameroon 1-1 Burkina Faso

The 2017 African cup of Nations kicked off in high spirits with two thrilling fixtures in group A.

Like it was the case in the opening game between Gabon and debutants Guinea Bissau, Cameroon also played to one all draw on Saturday at Stade de L’Amitie in Libreville, Gabon.

Skipper Benjamin Moukandjo  gave the indomitable lions the lead in the first half but Issoufou Dayo levelled matters 13 minutes to time.

The Burkinabes started the better side enjoying majority of possession. Jonathan Pitroipa tested the back of the net as early as the 6th minute but his goal was ruled for offside.

However, Cameroon remained composed and calm at the back opting to attack on the break.

Captain Benjamin Moukandjo converted from a direct free kick five minutes after the half hour mark to give the four time winners a first half lead.

Burkina Faso kept surging forward even after recess and the pressure paid off dividends in the 77th minute.

Issoufou capitalised on a poor clearance from Cameroon goalkeeper Fabian Ondoa to nod home the leveller.

The result means all the four teams in group A are on equal footing. Burkina Faso are top of the group while Cameroon follow closely both with a point apiece.

Group A games resume on Wednesday with hosts Gabon playing against Burkina Faso while Cameroon play Guinea Bissau.

Line ups:

Burkina Faso XI: Herve Koffi Kouakou (G.K), Bakary Kone, Patrcik B. Arnaud Malo, Niguimbe

Prejuce Nakoulma, Razack Traore Abdou, Alain Traore Sibiri, Yann Pitropia Benninwende, Issoufou Dayo, Charles Kabore, Bertrand Traore, Yacouba Coulibaly

Cameroon XI: Joseph Ondoa (G.K), Ernest Olivier Mabouka Massoussi, Adolphe

Teiku Kamgang, Michael Ngadjui Ngadeu, Ambrose Oyongo Bitolo, Clinton Njie, Benjamin

Moukandjo , Jacques Daogari Zoua, Christian Mougang Bassogog, Georges Constant

Mandjeck, Sebastien Clovis Siani

Museveni’s Keynote Address at France-Africa Summit on Partnership, Peace and Emergency

Chimpreports - Sun, 01/15/2017 - 10:48

I want to take this singular opportunity to thank Their Excellencies President Keita and Hollande for inviting me to talk about a subject, I am familiar with, especially here in Africa regarding “Partnership, Peace and Emergency”

We are here to discuss mainly the security situation in Africa. Up to 1990, the insecurity in Africa was, in part, being caused by colonialism. When the Organization of the African Unity (OAU) was founded in 1963, only 36 countries attended the founding conference.

The rest of the present 54 countries were still under colonialism. That OAU Conference resolved, among other decisions, to liberate the whole continent, by force if necessary. Supported by some few African countries, the socialist countries and some progressive countries and forces in the West, the African Liberation Movements, by 1974, a mere 11 years after the 1963 Addis Ababa Conference, were able to inflict defeat on the Portuguese Empire in Africa, leading to the Independence of Mozambique, Angola and Guinea Bissau. By 1994, the whole of Africa had been liberated.

Indeed, Southern Africa, which was the last to be liberated is now the most peaceful except for some isolated remnants of actions such as those of Renamo in Mozambique.

In other parts of the continent, however, there is quite alot of insecurity. I do not have to enumerate the areas. Many peace conferences are held to address these conflicts, including this one in Bamako. I, however, always feel concerned because these conferences tend to address the consequences of these conflicts rather than the causes. They address wars, coup d’états, election results disagreements, sometimes total breakdowns of state structures, etc

The question, however, is: “What is the cause of these endless conflicts and upheavals?” Our observation of the last 55 years, starting with the Congo crisis of 1960 but without forgetting the earlier problems, is that the main problem in Africa is ideological. The political elite, many of them acting on behalf of foreign interests, have failed to determine what is more important: interest or identity. What is more important ─ identity of groups or interests of those particular groups? The correct answer is that interests are always more important than identity.

However, sometimes, identity is also important ─ not to the exclusion of interests but important enough to become a main problem. When the Whites in South Africa said that Black people could not vote and, along with dogs, could not enter certain hotels, then identity had become a major problem. Our brother country, the Sudan (the old Sudan), faced the issue of identity. Was it Arab or was it African? Was it Islamic or Christian? That question, among others, was at the root of the civil war that broke out immediately after Independence.

Our brother peoples of the Sudan have been trying to deal with that issue and the efforts are going on. Somebody seeking to eclipse or obliterate the identity of any of our African peoples is to commit a crime against humanity. In Uganda’s case, we had alot of turmoil and lost 800,000 people killed extra-judicially on account of those ideological mistakes. The manipulation was to create conflicts among the tribes and the religious denominations: Baganda vs Banyoro, Catholics vs Protestants, Christians vs Moslems etc.

Therefore, in the cases where our people are persecuted for their identity by chauvinists of any description (religious, racial or tribal sectarianism and chauvinism), we must take a principled position and oppose the mistake makers.

Nevertheless, much of the chaos in Africa and, indeed, in other parts of the world, is not caused by the legitimate struggle for defending identity threatened by chauvinism, but, rather, by opportunists manipulating identity and totally forgetting about the peoples interests. What are the legitimate interests of the people? The major interests are: prosperity and security. Prosperity involves dealing with the 10 strategic bottlenecks we have identified in Uganda. These are:

(i) Ideological disorientation;

(ii) A weak State, especially the Army, that needs strengthening;

(iii) Under-developed infrastructure (the railways, the roads, the electricity, the telephones, piped water, etc.);

(iv) The underdevelopment of the human resource (lack of education and poor health for the population);

(v) Interfering with the private sector (either by policy or by corruption);

(vi) A fragmented African market on account of colonialism;

(vii) Exporting unprocessed raw materials and, therefore, getting little money and losing jobs; this is caused by lack of industrialization;

(viii) The underdevelopment of the services sector (hotels, banking, transport, insurance, etc.);

(ix) The underdevelopment of agriculture;

(x) The attack on democracy.

As you can see, the 10 strategic bottlenecks include the pseudo-ideology of sectarianism as bottleneck number one described as “ideological disorientation”. Except where identity is threatened by chauvinism, emphasizing identity or trying to manipulate that issue for politics and popular support, is a false step. It forgets about the real interests of the people.

I am a cattle keeper from the savannah part of the Great Lakes region of Africa. First of all, within the savannah areas, there were job specialization castes of cultivators, cattle-keepers, blacksmiths (Abaheesi), textiles people (Abakomagyi), ceramics people (Abanogoozi), etc. etc. These groups, invariably and without exception, depend on each other.

Cattle-keepers buy crops, beverages, alcohol etc, from the cultivators. Cultivators, get ghee, milk, meat, leather (skins and hides), etc., from the cattle-keepers. Especially in the past, with a low-level of technology, to keep cattle and seriously grow crops at the same time, was very difficult. Therefore, specialization and symbiosis was correct and efficient in the circumstances.

All the groups would buy iron products from the Baheesi (blacksmiths), pottery items from the Banogoozi (ceramics people), textiles from the Bakomagyi (bark cloth makers). The bark cloth were called embugu or ebitooma. This barter trade was called okuchurika.

The exchange of goods and services among the people of the savannah notwithstanding, the savannah people, additionally, in order to improve their lives, had to exchange goods and services with the peoples of the forest (present day Congo), the peoples of the mountains (Rwenzori, Elgon) and the Kigyezi Highlands) and the peoples of the Indian Ocean Coast (Zanzibar, Tanganyika, present day Tanzania).

Out of the forest, the savannah people were getting copper, Ivory, giraffe hair products (amooshe) and, sometimes, iron products while from the coast we were getting textiles, guns and gun-powder, glass beads (enkwaanzi) from Mesopotamia and cowries-shells (ensiimbi) that we were using as money. Up to today, money (modern paper money) is called ensiimbi (cowries-shells).

Therefore, since time immemorial, the peoples of the Great Lakes, the Congo forest, the mountains of Central Africa and the Indian Ocean coast, were depending on one another. It was the ego-centric chiefs that interfered with this inter-dependence by trying to maintain fiefdoms over their people and inflicting extortions on the very useful long distance travellers. It is these chiefs that weakened us from within and caused us to be colonized. If the people of the Great Lakes had combined, we would have defeated any colonizer.

That was in the past. Even at that time, the need for interdependence was clear. That logic was betrayed by the ego-centric chiefs that failed to unite our people and promoted fratricidal conflicts. Today, the logic is even clearer. With modern industrial and commercial production, you need big markets. Being a cattle-keeper, I produce milk, beef and leather. I also produce bananas, coffee, tea, cassava, fruits etc. The people in my area do not buy my products because they produce the same products.

The complementarity among the people of my area in terms of the exchange of goods and services is very low because those most industrious people produce similar products. The saviors of the people of the savannah are, therefore, the people of Kampala and beyond (Kampala is in what would have been forest zone if it was not for human settlement). It is those people of the cities of Uganda and the other parts of East Africa that buy products of my area. It is them that are responsible for the prosperity of my area. The people of Kampala are also benefitting from the savannah area. Many Kampala people are traders or manufacturers. They sell their products to the people of the savannah.

The Kampala hotel owners accommodate hundreds of thousands of tourists destined for the National Parks in the savannah area. The wider East Africa sells products to Uganda including the savannah area. Kenya sells to Uganda goods and services worth US$ 600 million per annum.

The people of Uganda, the people of East Africa support one another’s prosperity. On account of the people of Uganda, the people of East Africa and the people of the world buying my products, I am able to build a good house, to buy a car, to support my children’s education, etc., etc.

That is why my ideology is patriotism within Uganda (as opposed to sectarianism) and Pan-Africanism when it comes to Africa. A united East Africa enables us to negotiate better with the rest of the world. The unity of the people of Uganda, the unity of the people of East Africa, the unity of the people of Africa are instruments for our people’s prosperity.

Therefore, sectarian ideologies are inimical to the prosperity of the people of Africa. They are pushed by parasites who manipulate identity for narrow personal interests, camouflaged as interests of the respective factions. It is a pseudo-ideology with no benefit for the people and with only destruction and regression.

Therefore, when somebody opportunistically highlights identity (religion, tribe, etc) instead of highlighting interest, he acts against our prosperity. That unprincipled highlighting of identity is a pseudo-diagnosis of societal problems. Almost inevitably, it creates friction which results into conflict that scares away investments, diverts resources from infrastructure to security and, above all, leads to tension among the otherwise partners in prosperity creation, the buyers and the sellers of Africa.

The second legitimate strategic interest of the people of Africa is strategic security. The 1.25 billion people of Africa, who will be 2.5 billion by 2050, should not be threatened by anybody either from within Africa or from outside. By dealing with sectarianism, we deal with internal war-causers using identity. We must, however, also deal with external aggressors of whatever type. Hence, African sovereignty must be protected from any external military and non-military interventions.

You have all seen the chaos generated in Libya and the whole of the Sahel as a consequence of military action by foreigners against the express objection of the African Summit of Heads of State. Such a crime should never be tolerated again. Genuine African freedom fighters do not need external militaries to assert their rights against internal dictators. The African stand-by forces and the African Crisis Response Force (Acril) will provide the answer if there is any need for military intervention.

We stood against the external influences in Somalia by fighting the criminal Al-Shabaab. We must stand against all foreign intervention in Africa without the approval of appropriate and legitimate African bodies. In the Bible there is the concept of the Trinity: God the Father, God the Son and God the Holy Spirit. The three combine to form one God although each one can also perform tasks independently like when Jesus came to die for us. Similarly, the Trinity of the national effort, the regional effort and the international effort, where there is genuine partnership like in Somalia, works well and can make impact. As our economies improve, we can rely more on the duolity of the national and the regional. This does not preclude sovereign Governments having bilateral arrangements with non-African partners.

I salute France for providing financial and technical support to the African Union Mission for Somalia (AMISON) in Somalia which has enabled the African Union to continue getting rid of Al-Shabab and providing an enabling environment for a government to be put in place.

Combining ideology collaborative and the efforts at the national, regional and international levels, in the short-run, with genuine partnership, will bring good results. In the medium and long term, as our economies improve, the peace-making packaging should entail using the national level and the regional level.

Unilateral actions by the international forces without the permission of the African Union or a legitimate national force (an elected Government) is imperialistic and must be rejected completely. It should never happen again. That is why I salute the recent stand in the Security Council when the African members ─ Senegal, Angola and Egypt refused to vote for the resolution that aimed at imposing sanctions on South Sudan. The Security Council and the UN in general are becoming famous in Africa for being terrorism conservators and vacuum creators. In Congo (DRC), the UN has been promoting dictatorship (Mobutu vs Lumumba) and conserving terrorism for the last 56 years.

Even today, there are 22,000 UN troops in the Congo but in Eastern Congo, poor Congolese are being slaughtered almost every week. In Libya and beyond, the UN has created dangerous vacuums.

You generally have four types of situations in Africa. There are countries where a vacuum of political and State actors has been created by either internal actors or foreign ones. In such countries, there are no pillars of State (Army, Police, Administration, Judiciary) or political parties with a national appeal. In such situations, you get political fragmentations as had happened in Somalia or the situation is held together by external forces without capable internal pillars of control. It is a type of ideological and political leukemia where the body can no longer manufacture its own blood and must depend on endless blood transfusions from outside. The unfortunate citizens who find themselves in such situations need serious ideological therapy.

The second scenario is where the politics has taken an unprincipled sectarian character but it is not yet a vacuum because there are capable factions that are still in conflict. Our task here should be to encourage these factions to work together and not aim at creating a vacuum by aiming at eliminating the exiting factions. Targeting those factions will negatively promote that country to category I where a vacuum has been created.

Scenario III is where the sectarian factions reach agreement and start working together. These efforts should be welcome and not impeded in any way or to be undermined.

Scenario IV is when the ideological therapy has been applied and the population has moved away from sectarianism (either wholly or partially) and to behaving in a political way rather than being manipulated along identity lines. They vote guided by need for employment, service delivery, wealth creation issues etc. etc. This is the healthy situation that we should ultimately aim at. Therefore, the uninformed and highhanded ways like some elements were utilizing in the recent Security Council debate on South Sudan in spite of our advice should be completely rejected. This is also another problem. Why should some players ignore our advice when we, obviously, know some of those situations better?

Where political fragmentation has already taken place, ideological therapy can be applied and reverse the situation. That is what saved Uganda. Starting with student groups in the mid-1960s, we were able to defeat the sectarian pushers sand reverse the decline of our country. A country cannot work for unity when there are no political groups with national ideological and political ideas. These national ideological and political ideas like the ones I have pointed out above, will generate a followership. The followership will help in forming national political parties and, eventually, other state organs like the Army. It is not correct to start fires guided by wrong ideas and then work to put out the fires. That way Africa will continue to be a continent of endless fire brigading.

I thank you.

Three dead, 13 injured in Mbarara car crush

The Monitor - Sun, 01/15/2017 - 10:09
According to police, the accident happened at about 3am on Sunday

Africa Cup of Nations Group A results - 1st update

The Monitor - Sun, 01/15/2017 - 09:49
Gabon 1 (Aubameyang 52) Guinea-Bissau 1 (J. Soares 90)

King Mumbere Still Being Misled, says Kibazanga

Chimpreports - Sun, 01/15/2017 - 07:07

The State Minister for Agriculture, Christopher Kibazanga has spoken out on the Jinja Magistrates Court incident where he appeared miserable, despondent and frustrated during the release and re-arrest of his elder brother Omusinga Wesley Mumbere.
The picture of Mr. Kibazanga taken on Friday while he was holding his forehead as Mumbere chatted with politicians from Kasese, flooded social media on Saturday with many people wondering how a senior government official of his caliber could look like a homeless orphan.
Numerous Facebook and Twitter users thought and passed judgment that the Minister was disappointed  because of the failure to save his brother from being rearrested after being granted bail.
Mumbere who is facing murder and terrorism related charges was given court bail but later picked by security on new charges.
Kibazanga on Saturday took to  social media, admitting he was both “bitter” and “frustrated”.
“I have read some comments on the thread (Facebook). Yesterday (Friday) was of course not a pleasant day for me but my bitterness and expression of frustration was not because it was clear that the King was going to be rearrested,” part of his statement read.
“It was because I heard and saw with my naked eyes and ears responsible people still misleading him.”
According to Kibazanga, some people from Kasese are misleading Mumbere.
“The question on my mind was why should our own people read the emotional state of the King and use it to flatter him. This was my bitterness,” Kibazanga explained.

Kiir Issues First 2017 Decree, Creates 7 New States

Chimpreports - Sun, 01/15/2017 - 05:54

South Sudan President, Salva Kiir has issued the first Republican Decree for the new year 2017,  creating additional 7 states on top of the contentious 28 states.
The national broadcaster SSTV on Saturday evening televised the new presidential decree expected to be subjected to national assembly approval.
“The President as the National Chairman of SPLM has named 7 new states,” part of the statement read on SST said.
The new states are Northern Upper Nile State with Renk as its capital, Central Upper Nile State to maintain Malakal as its capital, Maiwut State and Maiwut town becomes its capital.
Other new states are Latjor State (Nassir as its capital), Bieh State (Waat), Akobo (Akobo) and Tumbura (Tumbura).
It remains unclear if Kiir consulted the First Vice President Taban Deng who is steering the Transitional Government of National Unity with the former.
Taban broke away from Machar and also took the latter’s position as number two in the unity government when he fled from capital Juba.
This is the second time President Kiir is creating new states.

On 2nd October 2015 Kiir issued a decree, forming 28 states out of the original 10.

The move was condemned by the Machar group, the peace negotiator IGAD and the international community since the peace agreement signed in August the same year was based on 10 states.
The National Assembly later approved the states and are existing to date.
The 28 states are Imatong, Nyamonong, Maridi, Amadi, Gbudwe, Juba, Terekeka, Yei River, Greater Bhar el Ghazal, Wau, Aweil, Lol, Aweil East, Twic , Gogrial East, Tonj, Eastern Lake, Western Lake, Greater Upper Nile, Northern Liech, Southern Liech, Ruweng, Eastern Nile, Jonglei, Western Nile,Western Bieh, Eastern Bieh, Latjor and Boma.

Kiir Issues First 2017 Decree, Creates 7 New States

Chimpreports - Sun, 01/15/2017 - 05:48

The South Sudan President, Salva Kiir has issued the first Republican Decree for the new year 2017, unilaterally creating additional 7 states on top of the contentious 28 states.
The national broadcaster SSTV on Saturday evening televised the new presidential decree that is going to be subjected to national assembly approval.
“The President as the National Chairman of SPLM has named 7 new states,” part of the statement read on SST said.
The new states are Northern Upper Nile State with Renk as its capital, Central Upper Nile State to maintain Malakal as its capital, Maiwut State and Maiwut town becomes its capital.
Other new states are Latjor State (Nassir as its capital), Bieh State (Waat), Akobo (Akobo) and Tumbura (Tumbura).
It remains unclear if Kiir consulted the First Vice President Taban Deng who is steering the Transitional Government of National Unity with the former.
Taban broke away from Machar and also contentiously took the latter’s position as number two in the unity government when he fled from the capital Juba.
This is the second time President Kiir is creating new states.
On 2nd October 2015 Kiir issued a decree, forming 28 states out of the original 10.
The move was condemned by the Machar group, the peace negotiator IGAD and the international community since the peace agreement signed in August the same year was based on 10 states.
The National Assembly later approved the states and are existing to date.
The 28 states are Imatong, Nyamonong, Maridi, Amadi, Gbudwe, Juba, Terekeka, Yei River, Greater Bhar el Ghazal, Wau, Aweil, Lol, Aweil East, Twic , Gogrial East, Tonj, Eastern Lake, Western Lake, Greater Upper Nile, Northern Liech, Southern Liech, Ruweng, Eastern Nile, Jonglei, Western Nile,Western Bieh, Eastern Bieh, Latjor and Boma.

Spicy Nile-perch kebabs

The Monitor - Sun, 01/15/2017 - 02:00
Nile perch is the fish of choice for this recipe, but any other type of white fish can be used

Spicy Nile-perch kebabs

The Monitor - Sun, 01/15/2017 - 02:00
Nile perch is the fish of choice for this recipe, but any other type of white fish can be used

Ugandan labels to watch this year

The Monitor - Sun, 01/15/2017 - 02:00
During the Kampala Fashion Week last year, a number of designers showcased their recent outfits, and some of them seemed more promising than others. We therefore bring you seven of these designers and why we should be on the look out for their designs this year.

Inside the world of ssenga Justine Nantume

The Monitor - Sun, 01/15/2017 - 02:00
At 44-year-old, Justine Nantume, commonly known as ssenga has put all her weaknesses and sad childhood aside to ensure that she gets and also gives her siblings the kind of life they missed.

What to put in a sideboard?

The Monitor - Sun, 01/15/2017 - 02:00
Some people call it a sideboard; others call it a wall unit. However, no matter what you call it, there are specific items that should be placed in this piece of furniture.

17 health and wellness rules to live by this year

The Monitor - Sun, 01/15/2017 - 02:00
Fitness and living a healthy lifestyle are some of the common targets on many people’s resolution lists. Hassan Ssentongo brings you tips on how you can achieve these two.

How oil cash bonanza beneficiaries failed to hide an elephant

The Monitor - Sun, 01/15/2017 - 02:00
The oil cash bonanza continues to arouse public anger. The anger reached fever heat with the dubious suit filed by Eric Sabiiti, a lawyer employed by the Electoral Commission.

President Obama bows out gracefully this week

The Monitor - Sun, 01/15/2017 - 02:00
On Friday, January 20, Mr Barack Obama, the first African-American to be elected president of the US, will leave the White House gracefully at the end of two four-year terms and hand over the reins of power peacefully and smoothly to Mr Donald Trump

2017: To live or not to live like a rat

The Monitor - Sun, 01/15/2017 - 02:00
If you walk slowly through some of those neighbourhoods in the greater Kampala that have experienced a housing expansion during the last 10 to 15 years, places like Najeera, Naalya, Kyaliwajjala, Namugongo, Kiteezi, Gaba, Bbunga, and so on

The fate of constitutions in Africa

The Monitor - Sun, 01/15/2017 - 02:00
Most of Africa lived or suffered under the yoke of imperialism and colonialism for centuries. The 19th and 20th centuries were the period of liberation wars and struggles for the right of self-determination and independence. By the end of the latter century, most of the continents’ countries and peoples were free and wallowing in the sovereignty of their internationally recognised respective states. The freedom, independence and sovereignty were enshrined in constitutional instruments guaranteed by international law. International law constantly maintains the theories of the status and characteristics of the principles of statehood enumerated above. However, the same principles which had been acquired or negotiated and imposed by imperial and colonial powers and initially accepted by the indigenous people of the African countries turned out later to be obstacles to the ambitious and designs of the native political leaders. Inherited, imposed and negotiated constitutions and laws began to be dismantled. Perfectly drafted laws and hitherto accepted principles at independence came to be rejected by the new Africa as predated and relics of imperialism and foreign dominance. The concepts of freedom, liberty and human rights were replaced by the desire to worship and obey those in power or who can deliver. In a previous work, Constitutional Law and Government in Uganda, I observed that writing about constitutions in the then emerging African states, is like writing past history. There were so many changes taking place so frequently that pre-empted new leaderships to either abolish or amend the constitutions beyond recognition. In fact, in those days, every new government or party that took over the reins of power embarked on this unnecessary exercise of making new constitutional and legal regimes to accord with its desires but not necessarily with the beliefs or aspirations of the people. Unfortunately, today, the situation has become worse. In a number of African countries, the constitution, which used to be the supreme law of the land and other laws which bound everyone within the state, have been replaced with presidential edicts, cabinet policies and ruling party resolutions. This is not an exaggeration. In several of these countries the president, cabinet and the ruling political party have effectively replaced the constitution, laws, parliament and the judiciary. Sadly, all the last enumerated institutions are now subservient to the will and authority of the executive. Elsewhere, we have enumerated many examples when the decisions of the executive have overridden fundamental provisions of the constitution and rules of law. Worse still, the other organs and institutions of state and NGOs have simply given verbal or written criticisms to these unfortunate trends without ever garnering the courage to challenge and have them nullified by mechanisms provided for in the constitutions. In consequence, what used to be fundamental, binding, sanctified and revered laws have been reduced to the same level as concepts of democracy, rule of law and human rights. In other words, the constitution and enacted laws have been drastically reduced in value, content and respectability. They have become mere guidelines in governance which can be followed, violated or infringed by those who hold the whip of absolute power. The new attitude will remind Ugandans of one incident during the days of former president Idi Amin when soldiers who were manning a road block at Makerere University interrogated senior members of the university staff wishing to walk beyond the roadblock. One illiterate soldier challenged them and said, “so you think you are clever and superior. Let us see how you out argue this.” He then produced a gun and discharged two bullets in the air and ordered the professors to beg for mercy and kneel for him and his fellow soldiers. They did. However, you can force a man or woman to obey and follow you but you cannot force their hearts to agree with or honour you. It is in this context that this story should be read as a guide to what is happening in any given state of the developing world. It is worth noting also that in Uganda when the truth dawns there are only minor differences between the NRM and other political parties fighting to replace the NRM in governing. They are more or less the same as NRM. The difference is only on the surface.

Believe you me, there’re so many stupidities to go around up there

The Monitor - Sun, 01/15/2017 - 02:00
A very hot start to 2017 it is we are having here in Uganda. Interesting action is not only over there in America.

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